Dogs learning new tricks

Never too old to learn something new

It’s long been recognized that keeping fit improves both our physical and mental health. But how many of us spend as much time exercising our minds as our bodies? Research continues to show that learning something new in older age is fulfilling, and can be life-changing.   Reaping the benefits Recent studies show that learning a new skill in later …

Caregiver with person in wheelchair

Senior respite care: caring for the caregivers

For the first time in history, Canada’s seniors outnumber children (5.9 million seniors, compared to 5.8 million children). By 2061, there could be as many as 12 million Canadian seniors versus 8 million children aged 14 and under. So, caring for our seniors is going to become a major part of life in Canada. Thanks to the involvement of family, friends …

senior woman's hands in lap

Managing the risks of dementia

Preventing Alzheimer’s and dementia, or at least delaying the onset, is achievable. Research points to several dementia risk factors, and many scientists believe that the key lies in identifying those risks and addressing them as early as possible. Intervention for prevention Dr Yakir Kaufman, a director of neurology services at Herzog Hospital, Jerusalem has suggested that a person displaying all …

Animatronic pets help alzheimer's sufferers

Purrs and wags: animatronic pets and senior care

Pet ownership for seniors has long been recognized as beneficial. Just 15 minutes spent bonding with an animal can instill a feeling of companionship and improve our general emotional wellbeing. However, when issues relating to health, mobility or finances arise, some seniors feel they are simply unable to care for a pet. As many as 1 in 4 senior Canadians …